"The books that help you the most are those which make you think the most.” Theodore Parker

Latest

podcast

London Radical Bookfair & Alternative Press Takeover 2014

The highlight of the ARB calender is coming around again!  This year we are joining forces with the Alternative Press Fair and taking over all 3 floors of the Bishopsgate Institute (opposite Liverpool Street station) to bring you something like 130 exhibitors, 20 guest speakers, workshops, art exhibitions and also the award ceremonies for the two ARB bookprizes, the Bread & Roses Award for Radical Publishing and the Little Rebels Childrens Book Award. And as if that wasn’t enough Bishopsgate Institute are also hosting a series of political talks in the run up to the bookfair. Saturday May 1oth is the all important date. Please visit it the London Radical Bookfair website for all the necessary details: http://londonradicalbookfair.wordpress.com/

information

New ARB member: Peterloo Bookshop

We’re very happy to announce a new ARB member, the Peterloo Bookshop based in Sheffield, but trading primarily online. Peterloo Bookshop is a not-for-profit project set up by Chris Connolly to make important second-hand political books available as cheaply as possible.

Not only are the books cheap but Peterloo offer a 50% rebate to anyone who sends the book back after reading it so it can be sold again. If you are in Sheffield and can collect the book rather than have it sent the prices are half price.

A complete list of books and prices is available on www.peterloo.net.  Do also get in touch with them if you have any books you would like to donate.

participate

Little Rebels Shortlist to be announced at special event at Housmans

The Little Rebels Children’s Book Award is a prize given by the ARB to highlight exceptional radical fiction for children aged 0-12. The shortlist will be announced at the following event at Housmans Bookshop in King’s Cross by guests from Letterbox Library, who administer the prize on behalf of the ARB.

BOOK TALK AND ANNOUNCEMENT OF LITTLE REBELS SHORTLIST
‘Are the Kids All Right? Representations of LGBTQ Characters in Children’s and YA Literature’
with B.J. Epstein, Mark Jennett and Letterbox Library
Saturday 29th March, 6.30pm

Entry £3, redeemable against any purchase

Guests from Alliance of Radical Booksellers member Letterbox Library will be introducing B.J.Epstein’s latest book which offers the first ever overview of English language children’s literature starring LGBTQ characters. The panel will consider:

*whether LGBTQ children’s books are inevitably marketed and shelved as ‘issues’ book;

*what sort of LGBTQ representations have existed in children’s literature to date (gay penguins, anyone?);

*how LGBTQ children’s books might be used in schools;

*how do we want to change the landscape of LGBTQ images in children’s books?;

*where should we all- publishers/authors, booksellers- be going from here?

Joining B.J. in the discussion will be Mark Jennett, a consultant and trainer specialising in diversity, who has worked with both the NUT and on the No Outsiders Project on addressing gender stereotypes and advancing sexuality equality in schools.

This talk will be followed by the announcement of the shortlist for the ARB’s Little Rebels Award for Radical Children’s Fiction; for further info. go to www.littlerebelsaward.wordpress.com
www.letterboxlibrary.com/

Title information

‘Are the Kids All Right?: Representations of LGBTQ Characters in Children’s and Young Adult Literature’ by B.J. Epstein
Paperback: 316 pages
Hammeron Press; 1st edition (31 Oct 2013)
ISBN-13: 978-0956450739

partner
| Comments Off

jobs

The 2014 Bread and Roses Shortlist is announced

We are delighted to announce the seven books which have made the shortlist for the Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing 2014. The winner will be announced at the London Radical Bookfair, on Saturday 10th May 2014.

‘Undercover: The True Story of Britain’s Secret Police’
by Rob Evans and Paul Lewis
(Faber and Faber, 2013)

undercover

The gripping stories of a group of police spies – written by the award-winning investigative journalists who exposed the Mark Kennedy scandal – and the uncovering of forty years of state espionage.

This was an undercover operation so secret that some of our most senior police officers had no idea it existed. The job of the clandestine unit was to monitor British ‘subversives’ – environmental activists, anti-racist groups, animal rights campaigners. Police stole the identities of dead people to create fake passports, driving licences and bank accounts. They then went deep undercover for years, inventing whole new lives so that they could live incognito among the people they were spying on. They used sex, intimate relationships and drugs to build their credibility. They betrayed friends, deceived lovers, even fathered children. And their operations continue today.

‘Undercover’ reveals the truth about secret police operations – the emotional turmoil, the psychological challenges and the human cost of a lifetime of deception – and asks whether such tactics can ever be justified.

‘Soldier Box: Why I Won’t Return to the War on Terror’
by Joe Glenton
(Verso, 2013)

soldierbox

When the War on Terror began, Joe Glenton signed up to serve his nation. He passed through basic training and deployed to Afghanistan in 2006. What he saw overseas left him disillusioned, and he returned manifesting symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. Refusing a second tour, he went AWOL and left the country, but returned voluntarily to fight his case, with the military accusing him of desertion. Despite being threatened with years in prison, he continued to speak out and won the support of many of his fellow soldiers.

Unsparingly honest and powerfully written, Glenton’s account of his personal war against an unjust occupation is the true story of an ordinary soldier standing up for his convictions, refusing to take part in a pointless conflict, and taking on the military establishment.

‘Story of a Death Foretold: The Coup against Salvador Allende, 11 September 1973′
by Oscar Guardiola-Rivera
(Bloomsbury, 2013)

storyofadeathforetold2

On 11 September 1973, President Salvador Allende of Chile, Latin America’s first democratically elected Marxist president, was deposed in a violent coup d’état. Early that morning the phone lines to Allende’s office were cut, army officers loyal to the republic were arrested and shortly afterwards bombs from four British-made Hawker Hunter jets began slamming into the presidential palace. Allende refused to leave his post, making broadcasts to encourage the Chilean people until the last pro-government radio station was silenced. Later that morning he was found dead, with an AK-47 that had been a gift from Fidel Castro by his side.

The coup had been planned for months, even years before it actually happened. In fact, from the moment Allende’s electoral victory in 1970 became a possibility, business leaders in Chile, extreme right-wing groups, high-ranking officers in the Chilean military and the US administration and the CIA worked together to secure a prompt and dramatic end to his progressive social programme.

Why Allende seemed such a threat in the political and economic context of the time and how the coup was engineered is the story Oscar Guardiola-Rivera tells, drawing on a wide range of sources, including phone transcripts and documents released as recently as 2008. It is a radical retelling of a moment in history that even at the height of Cold War paranoia – a time when Henry Kissinger described Chile as ‘a dagger pointed at the heart of Antarctica’ –shocked the world and which continues to resonate today. As the uprisings of the Arab Spring and the global protests at austerity measures introduced since the crash of 2008 show, the world is struggling to deal with the economic and political dilemmas Allende faced at the time.

‘Who Needs the Cuts? : Myths of the Economic Crisis’
by Barry Kushner and Saville Kushner
(Hesperus Press, 2013)

whoneedsthecuts

The Coalition Government in the United Kingdom, like other governments, is embarking on an unprecedented round of spending cuts. Talk of deficits, the National Debt, Quantitative Easing and other economic terminology is presented to the public as evidence that there is a vital need for some of the most drastic public-sector cuts we have ever faced.

In this highly-readbale book, Barry and Saville Kushner show clearly and convincingly that there is an alternative story that is not being told. There is a view of the economic events of the past five years that does not see the UK in debt crisis. It offers choice, differences of opinion, uncertainty and hope. It takes us on a different voyage, one beyond economics into politics and visions of society, our expectations and ambitions.

‘No Place to Call Home: Inside the Real Lives of Gypsies and Travellers’
by Katharine Quarmby
(Oneworld, 2013)

noplacetocallhome

The shocking, poignant story of rejection, eviction and the fight for a home.

They are reviled. For centuries the Roma have wandered Europe; during the Holocaust half a million were killed. After World War II and during the Troubles, a wave of Irish Travellers moved to England to make a better, safer life. They found places to settle down – but then, as Occupy was taking over Wall Street and London, the vocal Dale Farm community in Essex was evicted from their land. Many did not leave quietly; they put up a legal and at times physical fight.

Award-winning journalist Katharine Quarmby takes us into the heat of the battle, following the Sheridan, McCarthy, Burton and Townsley families before and after the eviction, from Dale Farm to Meriden and other trouble spots. Based on exclusive access over the course of seven years and rich historical research, ‘No Place to Call Home’ is a stunning narrative of long-sought justice.

‘Cancel the Apocalypse: The New Path to Prosperity’
by Andrew Simms
(Little, Brown, 2013)

canceltheapocalypse

Ever get the feeling that things are falling apart? You’re not alone. From bad banks to global warming, it can all look hopeless, but what if everything could turn out, well, even better than before? What if the only thing holding us back is a lack of imagination and a surplus of old orthodoxies?

It’s a topsy-turvy world in which a country can import the same amount of ice-cream, toilet paper and other goods as it exports, and where top bankers are paid millions for destroying economic value, while hospital cleaners create value many times their pay.

In fascinating and iconoclastic detail – on everything from the cash in your pocket to the food on our plates and the shape of our working lives – ‘Cancel the Apocalypse’ describes how the relentless race for economic growth is not always one worth winning, how excessive materialism has come at a terrible cost to our environment, and hasn’t even made us any happier in the process.

Simms believes passionately in the human capacity for change, and shows how the good life remains in our grasp. While global warming and financial meltdown might feel like modern day horsemen of the apocalypse, Simms shows how such end of the world scenarios offer us the chance for a new beginning.

‘Revolting Subjects: Social Abjection and Resistance in Neoliberal Britain’
by Imogen Tyler
(Zed Books, 2013)

revoltingsubjects

‘Revolting Subjects’ is a groundbreaking account of social abjection in contemporary Britain, exploring how particular groups are figured as ‘revolting’ and how they in turn ‘revolt’ against their subjectification. The book utilises a number of high-profile and in-depth case studies – including ‘chavs’, asylum seekers, Gypsies, anarchists and the disabled – to examine the ways in which individuals and groups negotiate restrictive, neoliberal ideologies of selfhood. In doing so, Tyler argues for a deeper psycho-social understanding of the role of aesthetic and representational forms in producing marginality, social exclusion and injustice, whilst also showing how it can be a creative resource for resistance.

Imaginative and original, ‘Revolting Subjects’ introduces a range of new insights into neoliberal societies, and will be essential reading for those concerned about widening inequalities, growing social unrest and social justice in the wider global context.

podcast

News from Nowhere’s 40th Birthday celebrations!

We are pleased to announce that this year ARB member News from Nowhere will be celebrating their 40th birthday. A not-for-profit worker’s co-operative, they are Liverpool’s leading radical & community bookshop. For more information please visit: http://www.newsfromnowhere.org.uk/

Below is a message from News from Nowhere with details of their celebratory events:

“We will be celebrating our 40th birthday this year! We have various events planned for the year (watch this space for updates) – but have two dates confirmed – please come along and help us celebrate!

Saturday 3 May 2014: ”WeBe40″ 40th Birthday Party
7pm til late

Join us to celebrate our 40th Birthday in style @ the Adelphi, Lime St, Liverpool City Centre. During the day there will be a Mayday event at the Adelphi organised by the Trades Council & Nerve, featuring speakers, workshops, music, stalls, discussion, banners & food. After a brief break to catch our breath, we’ll go headlong into party-mode with a stunning line-up of musicians – to be announced. Free – all welcome. Save the date! WeBe40!

Sunday 1 June 2014: ”WeBe40″ Radical Bookfair & Spaces of Dissent Forum
11am – 6pm

Celebrate our 40th Birthday with us @ the Bluecoat Arts Centre, School Lane, Liverpool City Centre. There’ll be a fantastic “WeBe40″ Radical Bookfair in the Hub with special offers, musical accompaniment from Stan the Harp and other musical offerings. In the Sandon Room, the Spaces of Dissent Forums will focus on Poetry as a Space of Dissent (12noon), Radical Bookselling/Radical Times (2pm) & Fiction as a Space of Dissent (4pm), with nationally-renowned novelists & poets – to be announced. Save the date! Free – all welcome.”

information

New radical bookshop ‘Five Leaves’ opens in Nottingham

We’re delighted to announce that a new radical bookshop has opened in Nottingham. Five Leaves Bookshop is  the brainchild of Ross Bradshaw, who runs the radical and literary imprint Five Leaves Publications. There’s a great interview here with Ross, conducted a couple of days before the shop opened. We wish him and his colleagues all the best.

In the last two years we have seen four new radical bookshops open: Calton Books in Glasgow, Hydra Books in Bristol, Just Books Collective in Belfast, People’s Bookshop in Durham, making Five Leaves the fifth. I think we can safely call that a revival!

participate

Shortlist for the The Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing 2013

We are happy to announce the eight book shortlist for the ARB’s bookprize for non-fiction,  The Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing 2013. The shortlist will now be passed to our guest judges, Nina Power, Laura Oldfield-Ford and Ken Livingstone, with a winner announced at the ARB organised London Radical Bookfair on May 11th 2013. If you would like to purchase any of these books, please do so at one of the Alliance of Radical Booksellers member shops.

‘What We Are Fighting For: A Radical Collective Manifesto’
edited by Federico Campagna and Emanuele Campiglio
(Pluto, 2012)

WhatWeAreFightingFor-cover

The age of austerity has brought a new generation of protesters on to the streets across the world. As the economic crisis meets the environmental crisis, millions fear what the future will bring but also dare to dream of a different society.

What We Are Fighting For tries to answer the question that the mainstream media loves to ask the protesters. The first radical, collective manifesto of the new decade, it brings together some of the key theorists and activists from the new networked and creative social movements. Contributors include Owen Jones, David Graeber, John Holloway, Nina Power, Mark Fisher, Franco Berardi Bifo and Marina Sitrin.

Chapters outline the alternative vision that animates the new global movement – from ‘new economics’ and ‘new governance’ to ‘new public’ and ‘new social imagination’. The book concludes by exploring ‘new tactics of struggle’.

‘No-Nonsense Guide to Equality’
by Danny Dorling
(New Internationalist , 2012)

equalitypic

A wide-ranging exploration of why inequality persists and what can be done about it. The No-Nonsense Guide to Equality discusses the positive effects that equality can have, using examples and case studies from across the globe, including many from the UK. It examines the lessons of history and covers race, gender and ethnicity, age, and wealth. Danny Dorling considers, realistically, just how equal it is possible to be, the challenges we face, and the factors that will lead to greater equality for all.

‘A People’s History of the Second World War: Resistance Versus Empire’
by Donny Gluckstein
(Pluto, 2012)

A-People-s-History-of-the-Second-World-War-Gluckstein-Donny-9780745328034

A People’s History of the Second World War unearths the fascinating history of the war as fought ‘from below’. Until now, the vast majority of historical accounts have focussed on the conflict between the Allied and Axis powers for imperialist mastery. Donny Gluckstein shows that in fact between 1939 and 1945 two distinct wars were fought – one ‘from above’ and one ‘from below’.

Using examples from countries under the Nazi heel, in the colonies and within the Axis and Allied camps, Gluckstein brings to life the very different struggle of the people’s and resistance movements which proliferated during the war. He shows how they fought not just fascism, but colonialism and empire, and were betrayed by the Allies at the war’s end.

This book will fundamentally challenge our understanding of the Second World War – both about the people who fought it and the reasons for which it was fought.

‘Secret Manoeuvres in the Dark: Corporate and Police Spying on Activists’
by Eveline Lubbers
(Pluto Press, 2012)

SecretM

The exposure of undercover policeman Mark Kennedy in the eco-activist movement revealed how the state monitors and undermines political activism. This book shows the other grave threat to our political freedoms – undercover activities by corporations.

Secret Manoeuvres in the Dark documents how corporations are halting legitimate action and investigation by activists. Using exclusive access to previously confidential sources, Eveline Lubbers shows how companies such as Nestlé, Shell and McDonalds use covert methods to evade accountability. She argues that corporate intelligence gathering has shifted from being reactive to pro-active, with important implications for democracy itself.

Secret Manoeuvres in the Dark will be vital reading for activists, investigative and citizen journalists, and all who care about freedom and democracy in the 21st century.

‘Why It’s Still Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions’
by Paul Mason
(Verso, 2012)

Mason

Originally published in 2012 to wide acclaim, this updated edition, Why It’s STILL Kicking Off Everywhere, includes coverage of the most recent events in the wave of revolt and revolution sweeping the planet – riots in Athen, student occupations in the UK, Quebec and Moscow, the emergence of the Occupy Movement and the tumult of the Arab Spring.

Economic crisis, social networking and a new political consciousness have come together to ignite a new generation of radicals. BBC journalist and author Paul Mason combines the anecdotes gleaned through first-hand reportage with political, economic and historical analysis to tell the story of today’s networked revolution. Why It’s Still Kicking Off Everywhere not only addresses contemporary struggles, it provides insights into the future of global revolt.

‘Scattered Sand: The Story of China’s Rural Migrants’
by Hsiao-Hung Pai
(Verso, 2012)

scattered_sand-book

Each year, 200 million workers from China’s vast rural interior travel between cities and regions in search of employment: the largest human migration in history. This indispensable army of labor contributes half of China’s GDP, but is an unorganized workforce – ‘scattered sand’ – and the most marginalized and impoverished group of workers in the country.

For two years, the award-winning journalist Hsiao-Hung Pai traveled across China to uncover the exploitation of workers at locations as diverse as Olympic construction sites and brick kilns in the Yellow River region, the factories of the Pearl River Delta and the suicide-ridden Foxconn complex. She witnessed AIDS-afflicted families and towns; recorded acts of labor militancy; and was reunited with long-lost relatives, estranged since her mother’s family fled for Taiwan during the Civil War. What she finds is a peasantry expected to sacrifice itself for the sake of national glory – just as it was under Mao.

‘Autonomy: The cover designs of Anarchy 1961-1970′
edited by Daniel Poyner
(Hyphen Press, 2012)

autonomy

Prominent among the themes of the journal Anarchy were education, the urban environment, work, workers self-organization, crime, psychology, as well as anarchist traditions and history; attention was given to literature, theatre, and cinema. Although its contributors were many and diverse, Anarchy was essentially the creation of one person, Colin Ward (1924-2010). With this journal, and throughout his work as a writer, editor, and activist, Ward proposed the idea that anarchist principles of mutual aid and autonomous organization outside a centralized state can be achieved here and now and are already at work all around us. The title of this book Autonomy takes up a defining idea of anarchism, as well as using again the word that Colin Ward had intended to be the title of his journal. Autonomy gives attention for the first time to the covers of Anarchy, designed mostly by Rufus Segar.

These little-known covers or wrappers front and back were often conceived as a continuous unit provided the enticing entry to the plain text pages inside. The book reproduces all of them in a sequence that suggests, incidentally, something of the history of graphic design in Britain in those years. The book gives a full picture of Anarchy. Daniel Poyner introduces the journal and its editor, and gives a transcript of his extended interview with Rufus Segar. We reprint a sparkling account of Anarchy by the late Raphael Samuel. The covers and their place in graphic design history are considered by the designer Richard Hollis. To round off the book, a full author and article index of Anarchy is provided. Autonomy writes a new chapter in graphic design history, based in a rich and unexpected source.

‘Alienation: An Introduction to Marx’s Theory’
by Dan Swain
(Bookmarks, 2012)

alienation

We live in a world in which human capacity to transform and control our lives has never been greater. Yet for most people the world is radically outside of their control. Their lives are dictated by the demands of employers and politicians. This is the phenomenon of alienation that the young radical Karl Marx began to diagnose in the early 1840s and remained pre-occupied with throughout his life. This accessible guide to the central aspect of Marx’s philosophy takes the reader through the development of the concept and its relevence today.

partner
| 1 Comment »

jobs

Freedom Bookshop re-opens after arson attack


In the early hours of Friday morning, Freedom Bookshop was firebombed. Luckily no one was hurt and the fire was contained.

This is not the first time Freedom has come under attack. As Britain’s oldest anarchist bookshop (founded in 1866), Freedom has been somewhat on the frontline of anti-anarchist aggression from the start. This latest attack has many similarities with a firebomb attack carried out some twenty years ago by the neo-nazi group Combat 18.

Much stock has been damaged, as have the electrics. Freedom, like all radical bookshops, is run on a shoe string, and volunteer effort. Freedom don’t have insurance so will be launching an official appeal imminently. In the meantime cheques made out to Freedom Press are welcomed, and can be sent to the shop address. Follow on Twitter and on website for details. http://www.freedompress.org.uk Freedom are also asking for donations of anarchist books to help replenish their stocks.

The following is a report from Tim Gee on the clean-up that took place on Saturday, at which scores of well-wishers came to help out:

Down a small alleyway off Whitechapel High Street, a short walk from London´s financial district, sits Britain´s oldest radical bookshop. Founded by Peter Kropotkin and Charlotte Wilson in the 1880s, it has been a hub for the city´s counterculture ever since – a pick up point for campaign materials, a meeting space for activists and a printer of radical literature (including the OT) as well as selling books.

But my visit is not on a normal day. In the small hours of the previous morning an attacker had forced open a shutter, broken a window, and set the inside alight. Next to the broken glass is a shelf full of volumes on George Orwell – perhaps Britain´s most quoted opponent of book-burning [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_hole] . The fire and water leaves his image distorted and charred. The books are reduced to an inseparable block of pulp.

A throng of volunteers have gathered for the clear-up. Some are anarchists, others are showing solidarity with a group that has for so long shown solidarity with others. The atmosphere is somehow both cheerful and defiant. There is a human chain carrying salvageable books up the stairs. As there seems to be quite a queue forming, I join the other group, tasked with the soul crushing job of picking, cataloguing and disposing of the books that are damaged beyond repair.

We organise ourselves into sorters and cataloguers, the latter of whom playfully get called the bureaucrats. “Hey bureaucrat – I´ve got five copies of Thinking Housing´ here, can you note that down?”. “Bureaucrat, are you listening? Five Anarchy in Actions”. Becoming aware of the managerial system we are inadvertently mimicking we decide to change tack and buddy up, instead rotating roles. No more bureaucrat-worker divide. As it turns out, it´s more efficient too.

In a way it is a cheerfulness of necessity. The job of noting down books for the scrapheap is a sad one. The camaraderie is the only alternative to tears as we clock up three, four, five hundred volumes. The un-saveable ones are taken away in sacks.

In their place comes cake and tea, then hot food. A bike powered sound-system pumps out funk tunes. Then a cheer across the building as the electrics flicker in to life. There´s a call out: ´does anyone need a job?´ followed by a wry chuckle and a movement of the yet-more people who have recently arrived, in to the back yard to start cleaning shelves.

The pile finished I head upstairs. It is an altogether happier scene. Thousands of books are piled from floor to ceiling: Zapata of Mexico, Mutual Aid, a history of Anti-Fascist Action. Squeezed around the edge are tens of people, with standing room only, jay-cloths in hand, scrubbing, chatting, restoring and ruminating. Instead of the choking stench of ash that overwhelms the downstairs, the fresh odour of cleaning spray fills the air. One by one the books are lovingly relieved of their sooty second-covers and returned to their former glory. The items destroyed are just a fraction of those that remain.

Three hours later and the shop is transformed. Everything has been removed, the fire blackened walls are being cleaned, and staff predict they will open again by Monday. 60 volunteers with no discernible leader have pulled off an awe-inspiring display of self organisation.

If the attacker´s plan was to make important ideas disappear down the memory hole, it looks as if it has spectacularly backfired. As the clean-up operation shows, there is more than one way to encounter an idea. One is to read about it. But wholly more powerful is to experience it. And so it is today that written concepts are lived in reality and anarchy is demonstrated in action.

Tim Gee is an author and activist based in London. His essay collection ‘You Can´t Evict an Idea’ will be published by Housmans later this month.

podcast

ARB launches new book prize: The Little Rebels Children’s Book Award

Last year the ARB set up the Bread & Roses Award for Radical Publishing, administered by Housmans Bookshop. This independent prize for adult non-fiction literature ran for the 1st time in 2011, with the prize awarded in May 2012. The award is being run again this year – for more information, go to www.bread-and-roses.co.uk

The Bread and Roses prize is going ahead again this year alongside a new, parallel, radical fiction children’s book prize: The Little Rebels Children’s Book Award. The prize will be administered by Letterbox Library on behalf of the ARB. The new Little Rebels Award is designed to recognise a rich tradition of radical publishing for children in the UK.

For this first year, the award will be restricted to fiction targeted at children aged 0-12. ‘Radical’ is defined widely to include books informed by inclusive/anti-discriminatory concerns or those which promote social equality or social justice.

Guest judges for the 2012 Little Rebels Award will be children’s author, Elizabeth Laird and Bookstart co-founder and editor, Wendy Cooling (see Guest Judges).

Prizes for both the Little Rebels and the Bread and Roses Awards will be presented at the ARB’s new, radical bookfair at Conway Hall, London, on May 11th 2013.

For more information please visit the Little Rebels website: http://littlerebelsaward.wordpress.com

information

ARB London Radical Bookfair 2013


On Saturday May 11th 2013, the ARB will be hosting a new radical bookfair, to take place in London’s Conway Hall. The idea behind the fair is to create an event which showcases the depth and breadth of radical publishing and bookselling in the UK. The ARB is composed of booksellers with a range of subject interests, including socialism, anarchism, peace/pacifism, sex & gender, environment, anti-racism and progressive children’s writing: we intend for the London Radical Bookfair to represent the full spectrum of radical publishing.

The event will culminate with the announcement of the winner of the ARB’s book prize for the best political non-fiction, The Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing. This year for the first time the Bread and Roses award will be complimented by a new prize, The Little Rebels Award, to be given for the best piece of fiction for readers aged 0-12 years.

As well as the bookfair in the main hall, we will be hosting talks in the Brockway Room throughout the day, with short-listed authors from the two book prizes presenting and discussing their work.

Entrance to the fair will be free for all. Food and drink will be available.

There will be lots of information about the fair and book awards to follow. An announcement for how to get involved in the fair, either as a stall holder or as a volunteer, will be made in early 2013. In the meantime if you would like to speak to someone about this event, please contact nik[at]housmans.com

participate
partner
jobs
site-map